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What's In an Email Address?

Posted by Carl E. Reid Wednesday, December 10, 2008 0 comments

You can tell quite a bit about a person from their email address. Email address name and case lettering may provide clues as to the type of person you will engage. If you think hiring managers, executives, recruiters and business professionals don't pay attention to email addresses, think again. Are you willing to take that risk with the competition in the job market being so fierce?

Your email address should answer the question "Am I committed to presenting a positive professional appearance, while marketing myself and my company?"

Sybil.Krill@anydomain.com is serious about her career or business. She provides an email address that presents a professional posture. A balanced amount of confidence is displayed in capitalizing the 1st letter of each part of her name. She is branding herself, because her email address reflects the same name she uses in her every day life, on her resume, business cards etc..

danny.krantos@anydomain.com almost achieves the same goal as Sybil.Krill@anydomain.com above. He may lack confidence, because the 1st letter in his first and last name is lower case.

bubbalicious@anydomain.com wants to be anonymous, whiling complaining about people not recognizing them or not responding back to their emails. Maybe they are also wondering why they are not getting calls for interviews or business meetings to present their services. This person is definitely not serious about their career or business posture. Cryptic email addresses beg for a response of "I'll get back to you, maybe".

MICHELLE.ARILLY@anydomain.com may love herself a little too much. Having confidence is one thing, but let's not go overboard. Following Internet and instant message rules, all UPPER CASE lettering is perceived as shouting. Is this person going to be high maintenance in the "attention" department?

Gary.Friptal@MyCompanyDomain.com provides the same professional posture as
Sybil.Krill@anydomain.com, whiling adding that extra branding touch. Their name is branded and so is their company. Like a commercial, both are tied together. When people see the company name they think of that person. When people see the person's name there is an instant association with that company.

Amy@MyCompanyDomain.com is professional but is it memorable? If you are the only Amy in your company, that might work for a while. What happens, if you leave the company? Amy.G.Winstrom@MyCompanyDomainName.com works better. If you change companies, your personal name brand recognition still goes with you.

A single name works best, if you purchase a "vanity" domain that contains your first and last name (i.e.
Amy@AmyWinstrom.com). Now you're cooking with branding gas.This can follow you no matter where your business travels take you.